Getting to today’s fashion


I entered the shop once, a while ago, took a look around and thought this is just another vintage shop, little did I know I was passing by a real institution of modern day fashion, until today.

The owner of the shop Franco Jocassi that we had the pleasure to meet is a collector; he started off collecting buttons accumulating through the years unique outfits, shoes bags and accessories from the 18th century until 1994. The shop holds one of the biggest vintage selections in the world.

Where it all started…

Pointing out the fact that the outfits of this shop are historical pieces and not just old used things lying around as one would think.

Iconic Chanel bag from 1985 a unique piece in the world

The vintage delirium started in 1984 and today we can describe this shop as a fashion library of clothe showing the evolution of outfits, styles and silhouettes throughout time influenced by factors such as art and cinema as well as social and economical changes that the world underwent these last couple of years.

An idea of the shop’s atmosphere

Each piece is meticulously chosen as Mr. Jocassi took the time to learn, research and understand fashion through the centuries. From Paul Poiret in the 20’s to Jeanne Lanvin, Madeleine Vionnet, Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel, Christian Dior with the new look after the war in the late 50’s and 60’s as well as Yves Saint Laurent, passing through the hippy period in the 1960’s that changed radically the way people dressed and looked at fashion, mentioning as well the punk period in London during the 60’s and 70’s led by Vivienne Westwood; then the pop age with Paco Rabbane, Andre Courreges and Pierre Cardin known for their very futuristic vision; talking as well about the importance of Gianni Versace in the early 90’s and other Italian designers like Valentino and Emilio Pucci that helped shape the identity of Italian fashion and style.

A Madeleine Vionnet dress detail circa 1930

Mr. Jocassi collaborated with many designers such as Karl Lagerfeld and Gianni Versace and big fashion companies like Marc Jacobs and Prada just to name a few, as these big names use the shop as a style library, a tool to find inspirations for their collections from fabrics, shapes, jewelry or any kind of items presented at vintage delirium as well as in the inventory of magazines and patterns from the last centuries.

A Vogue issue from the 30’s
Emanuel Ungaro dress from the 60’s details
Gianni Versace overalls made in metal mesh from the 80’s

The vintage delirium is for a stylist or designer what a library would be to a writer or a museum to a historian.

Looking at the vintage pieces I was able to relate to recent collections I have seen. In fact, like history fashion is a repetitive process, the difference is that with fashion you have the possibility to add take away, recreate, reinterpret, reintroduce it’s a regenerative process of perpetual rebirth where at the end nothing looks the same and each collection is unique.

from a Chanel dress of the 20’s to Dolce & Gabbana’s F/W 2012-13
from Yves Saint Laurent in the 70’s to Burberry S/S 2013 electric blue trench coats
from a Capucci ruffled dress to Balanciaga S/S 2013 and Lanvin F/W 2012-13
from a vintage coat to Etro’s F/W 2012-13
from a vintage flashy yellow coat to Blumarine’s F/W 2012-13
from a Capucci 60’s checkered top to Marc Jacobs S/S 2013 and Louis Vuitton S/S 2013
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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Matteo Bardi says:

    ….brava Gabriela…..!!!

  2. Brenda says:

    very interesting! loved the pictures!! keep it up!!

  3. co says:

    where is this shop! we should visit it! (:

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